Tag: depression

What is your body trying to tell you?

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What is your body trying to tell you?

Blog post by Kat Deery, GSCI

Have you ever experienced a break out of acne after a stressful week? Random pains occur in your body without explanation? Or perhaps you're developing arthritis in your thirties, wondering how could this be? Well sometimes these occurrences can be explained through Somatic Therapy.

Somatic Therapy is an approach to therapy that focuses on the mind-body-soul connection. This theory supports the idea that what manifests in the physical is a reflection of what is happening mentally and emotionally. It’s known that stress can take a physical toll on the body: you may be more irritable, your sleep patterns may be disrupted, or your appetite changes. Our central nervous system adjusts and reacts to the emotional and mental stress we experience. When traumatic experiences lay dormant and do not receive the proper attention they deserve, the emotional stress of it all can get stuck in the body and manifest itself in physical ways. 

Somatic therapy is an experiential process that can work in conjunction with other psychotherapy approaches to counseling like cognitive behavioral therapy to alleviate symptoms and facilitate healing. This type of therapy is often used with clients who are experiencing anxiety, depression, grief, trauma, chronic pain or illness, etc. Interventions like deep breathing, meditation, exercise, yoga, dance, art therapy, and cognitive reframing are all ways to facilitate body-mind-soul connection and spark some self awareness. 

Why is Somatic Therapy relevant to counseling today?

It’s no question that 2020 has been a challenging year for all of us, with a global pandemic occurring, racial injustices continuing, jobs being lost, family members isolated, travel plans cancelled, online schooling, political arguments, and so much more it’s no wonder rates of depression and anxiety are increasing. 

I encourage you to take a look at your body’s wellbeing. Has it been affected by these events over the last few months...Are you seeing any changes that concern you? What is your body telling you? Do you need more rest? Do you need to implement  boundaries with those around you? Do you need more love and acceptance of yourself? 

Sometimes chronic pain like arthritis is your body telling you that it feels criticized or you're holding on to resentment. Acne could be your body telling you that you need to increase acceptance of the self. 

Somatic therapy can provide healing to those who participate because not only does it relieve some of the physical symptoms it investigates the root cause and attempts to heal those wounds from the inside out. Using techniques like positive self-talk, intentional body movement, and cognitive restructuring are incredible ways to combat the emotional causes for our physical symptoms. Somatic therapy is not a replacement for professional medical care but it is a great addition to improve how we care for our bodies, mind, body and spirit. 


Citations

Hay, L. L. (2012). Heal your body: The mental causes for physical illness and the metaphysical way to overcome them. Carlsbad, CA: Hay House.

Somatic Therapy. (n.d.). Retrieved September 09, 2020, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/somatic-therapy


To book an appointment with Katherine Deery, click here.


"Person Standing on Shores" Photo by Matt Hardy from Pexels

Tags:

  • anxiety
  • counseling
  • covid
  • depression
  • healing
  • mental health
  • mindfulness
  • psychotherapy
  • resilience
  • self help
  • self-care
  • somatic experiencing
  • stress

Cultivating Joy

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Cultivating joy

Blog post by Britt McKinney, RMCHI

This is the third post in our series exploring Yalom’s “ultimate concerns.”  If this is the first one you’re reading, here’s what you need to know: we can identify things about who we are by considering the meaning we ascribe to death, freedom, isolation, and meaningless in our lives.

Reading that for the first time may be intimidating, so don’t hesitate to earmark this post and read the ones that led up to this section of the discussion.

This post is the one promised last time to explore cultivating joy, which is a catchy way to say that we have the ability to create positivity in our lives. These are 4 tools you can use to increase your agency in enjoying life more fully.


1: When we discuss the concept of death, it gives us an opportunity to consider what it feels like to be alive. Since life and death often trigger anxieties, it is beneficial to take things one breath at a time, literally.

We can be present in the moment by using breath meditation, which can lower heart rate and blood pressure.


2: Freedom is paramount on this topic of joy and that’s because we have the freedom to influence our own outlooks and attitudes. That being said, why not focus on pleasurable thoughts?

Laughter is typically pleasant,,, but sometimes it feels forced. That’s okay! According to Dr. Madan Kataria, when we choose to laugh, whether it is genuine or contrived, and it can lower the cortisol (stress responses) inside us.


3: Isolation is the hot topic during “social distancing”... Right? So try looking at it creatively.

The words we use reflect the things we believe and at times the opposite is true. Either way, it is powerful to consider changing the words we use to describe this specific COVID-19 precaution toward the use of the term “physical distancing” and see what happens as a result.


4: Meaninglessness and joy is the interesting combination and the trickiest challenge to present.

We can consider the core emotions that are at the root of all things to work through this connection. There are a few primary emotions: joy, sadness, fear (some consider anger and disgust core emotions too). Considering ‘joy’ is a deep-rooted and motivating feeling, it is the one we can see when considering what is and is not meaningless. In other words, getting in touch with the things that bring us joy can be a compass for navigating through the way we pursue certain things instead of others.


This discussion of joy may not be a perfect fit for all. The beautiful thing: each person is free to create their own priorities.

Take what you need from this post and leave what’s left.


**Pronoun “their” used to encompass all people.


Britt McKinney is a master level therapist at Agape Therapy Institute.  To book an appointment with Britt, click here.


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Tags:

  • coronavirus
  • counseling
  • covid
  • depression
  • existential therapy
  • healing
  • joy
  • mental health
  • mindfulness
  • psychotherapy
  • resilience
  • self-care
  • stress
  • yalom

Being Well in COVID-19

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Being well in COVID-19

Blog post by Brittney McKinney, RMCHI

Continuing our exploration of who we are, we’ll consider the same topics from Irvin D. Yalom, MD--but this time, as they relate to our wellness.

Remember Yalom’s 4  “ultimate concerns”: death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness? Here’s the questions related to each topic to ask when considering our wellness.

1: Death
Am I being active? How am I sleeping? What am I eating?

2: Freedom
Do I choose constructive perspectives? Can I cultivate joy? Am I caring for my spirit?

3: Isolation
Am I helping others?

4: Meaninglessness
Do I have social support to help me live my best life? Am I working on coping skills with my therapist?

Cultivating joy is, by far, the coolest freedom we all have. Stay tuned for another post related to what Yalom’s concepts could have to do with the notion of joy.

Be well within! You’re working toward that every time you access resources that support your mental health.

To book an appointment with Britt McKinney, RMHCI, click here.


Photo by Gustavo Fring from Pexels

Tags:

  • community
  • coronavirus
  • counseling
  • covid
  • depression
  • existential therapy
  • healing
  • mental health
  • psychotherapy
  • resilience
  • self-care
  • stress
  • yalom

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