Tag: self help

​Relationship Tips for 2020 – Part 3

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Relationship Tips for 2020 – Part 3

Blog by Jenn Baker, GSCI at Agape Therapy Institute

Welcome to Part three of Relationship Tips for 2020. If you haven’t already, you can read Parts 1 and 2 for tips on acknowledging your partner and taking time for yourself. 

I’d like to follow up on last week’s relationship tips and have you check in with yourself. Were you able to carve out some alone time for self-care last week? Did you struggle to find the time? Think about some ways that you can prioritize self-care in your life. Loving others begins with self-love and you are worthy of love. 

For this week, I’d like to focus on: 

Connecting with Friends and Family – Humans are social creatures by nature. We all need social support and connection to thrive as individuals and couples. While alone time is very important, it is also important to maintain our connection with others. 

Consider taking time during your day to reach out to friends and family. Think of the things that you used to do with them pre-pandemic. If you can’t socialize in the same ways, find creative solutions to connect with your loved ones safely. 

Alternatives to face-to-face interactions, could include:

    • Online video chats
    • Virtual game nights
    • Go for a walk outside with a friend
    • Host an outdoor picnic
    • Be creative!

Stay tuned for next week’s blog with the next relationship tip for 2020.

To make an appointment with Jenn Baker, GSCI, click here.


"People On A Video Call" Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

Tags:

  • community
  • counseling
  • couples therapy
  • covid
  • family therapy
  • healing
  • mental health
  • mindfulness
  • partnership
  • psychotherapy
  • relationships
  • self help
  • self-care
  • solution focused

​Relationship Tips for 2020 – Part 2

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Relationship Tips for 2020 – Part 2

Blog by Jenn Baker, GSCI at Agape Therapy Institute

Welcome to Part two of Relationship Tips for 2020. Last week’s blog discussed how to increase positive interactions with your partner by using acknowledgments, which means offering words of appreciation. During the last week, did you and your partner have a chance to acknowledge one another? How did it feel to offer and receive appreciation? 

For many of us, trying something new may feel uncomfortable at first. Like anything else, it will become more natural over time with practice. Be patient and kind with yourself and your loved one. Remembering to bring this practice into your daily life will continue to strengthen your connection. 

For this week, I’d like to focus on:

  • Making Time For Yourself – No matter how much we love being with our loved ones, every person needs alone time to de-stress and recharge. Coordinate and plan this special time each and every day. Make sure that you use this time to care solely for yourself. Unplug from your phone, social media, and the news. Focus on doing something that brings you peace or joy. You may find it helpful to make a list of activities that you love and check one off the list every day. Some ideas include:
    • Taking a bubble bath
    • Listening to music
    • Meditating
    • Getting outdoors
    • Watching your favorite TV show
    • Reading a book
    • Writing in a journal
    • Cooking your favorite meal
    • Anything you love to do for you

Stay tuned for next week’s blog with the next relationship tip for 2020.

To book an appointment with Jennifer Baker, GSCI click here.


"Woman Lying on a White Bathtub" Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Tags:

  • communication
  • counseling
  • couples therapy
  • family therapy
  • healing
  • mental health
  • mindfulness
  • partnership
  • psychotherapy
  • relationships
  • self help
  • self-care
  • stress

Relationship Tips for 2020 – Part 1

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Relationship Tips for 2020 – Part 1

Blog by Jenn Baker, GSCI

While each person’s situation is unique, each and every one of us is experiencing unprecedented stress in our lives this year. We face an ongoing global pandemic, continued racial injustices, an upcoming presidential election in a country increasingly divided, stress on our educational system, and fears of a global recession, just to name a few. 

For many of us, these events have led to unemployment, financial problems, death of loved ones, health issues, depression, anxiety, fear, and other losses, which all take a toll on our relationships. 

Data show that divorce rates are spiking across the country. Do you find that you and your loved one are fighting more frequently? Do you feel emotionally distant or disconnected from your partner? These feelings are increasingly common as many relationships are experiencing strain during this time. 

On a more hopeful note, these challenges offer us an opportunity for growth and repair. In this blog, I will present one tip each week. For this week, I’d like to focus on:

Acknowledging Your Partner – Studies have shown that successful relationships have a ratio of 5:1 positive to negative interactions. You can work on increasing positive interactions each day by acknowledging your partner. Acknowledgment is the act of communicating positive appreciation for the things that your partner does and brings to your relationship. An example would be to say “I appreciate you cooking dinner for us last night.”

    • Make a list of the things that you are grateful for in your relationship.
    • Make sure to include those things you may take for granted that your partner does.
    • Take the time to acknowledge your partner daily to express your gratitude, appreciation, love, and respect and increase feelings of connection.

Stay tuned for next week’s blog with the next relationship tip for 2020.

Citations:

Gehart, D. R. (2016). Theory and treatment planning in family therapy: A competency-based approach. Australia: Cengage Learning.

Rosner, E. (2020, September 02). US divorce rates skyrocket amid COVID-19 pandemic. Retrieved September 17, 2020, from https://nypost.com/2020/09/01/divorce-rates-skyrocket-in-u-s-amid-covid-19/

Koch-Sheras, P. R., & Sheras, P. L. (2006). Couple power therapy: Building commitment, cooperation, communication, and community in relationships. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

To book an appointment with Jenn Baker, GSCI, click here.


"Couple While Holding Hands" Photo by Leah Kelley from Pexels

Tags:

  • communication
  • counseling
  • couples therapy
  • family therapy
  • healing
  • mental health
  • partnership
  • relationships
  • self help

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