Tag: healing

Being Well in COVID-19

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Being well in COVID-19

Blog post by Brittney McKinney, RMCHI

Continuing our exploration of who we are, we’ll consider the same topics from Irvin D. Yalom, MD--but this time, as they relate to our wellness.

Remember Yalom’s 4  “ultimate concerns”: death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness? Here’s the questions related to each topic to ask when considering our wellness.

1: Death
Am I being active? How am I sleeping? What am I eating?

2: Freedom
Do I choose constructive perspectives? Can I cultivate joy? Am I caring for my spirit?

3: Isolation
Am I helping others?

4: Meaninglessness
Do I have social support to help me live my best life? Am I working on coping skills with my therapist?

Cultivating joy is, by far, the coolest freedom we all have. Stay tuned for another post related to what Yalom’s concepts could have to do with the notion of joy.

Be well within! You’re working toward that every time you access resources that support your mental health.

To book an appointment with Britt McKinney, RMHCI, click here.


Photo by Gustavo Fring from Pexels

Tags:

  • community
  • coronavirus
  • counseling
  • covid
  • depression
  • existential therapy
  • healing
  • mental health
  • psychotherapy
  • resilience
  • self-care
  • stress
  • yalom

Black Lives Matter

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The disturbing reality is that Black bodies and lives generally do not matter, and they haven’t mattered for centuries in our society. There is a racist and prejudiced system that marginalizes, oppresses, disenfranchises, traumatizes, incarcerates, and kills Black lives, because of a deep-rooted belief that Black skin is not only inferior, but to be feared. We have seen this time and time again. This is not merely an opinion up for debate; it is a fact.

This is not right, nor is it just. At Agape Therapy Institute, we stand in solidarity with Black lives in supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. We see the pain, the anguish, the anger, the trauma, the violence, the fear, the injustice that Black lives have had no choice but to endure. To all Black lives we say to you: Your thoughts matter. Your feelings matter. Your pain, your anger, your trauma, your fear, your sadness matter. Your stories matter. Your bodies matter. Your lives matter. You matter. 

As mental health professionals, we know all too well the effects of trauma on individuals, couples, families and communities, on the micro and macro levels. Complex and chronic trauma is especially prominent for Black lives in our society. And yet, we know that Blacks are statistically the least likely of the races to engage in the mental health counseling experience. At Agape Therapy Institute, we understand this is because mental health counseling is largely founded on white philosophies and beliefs, that often alienates people of color. We understand the traditional platform of mental health counseling isn’t designed to fit or support the Black experience. In fact, it often pathologizes and gaslights Black experiences. 

We believe black mental health matters, so we are committed to ensuring this is not the experience at Agape Therapy Institute. Our mission is to provide affordable and accessible mental health counseling to the community, including and especially for Black lives. We will offer a safe, nonjudgmental, accepting space to process trauma, anxiety, depression, fear and anger, to find validation, empathy and support to leverage your strengths, write your story, and achieve your goals. We will also actively object to systemic racism we encounter in our practice, and are committed to racial justice being a part of our milieu therapeutic approach at Agape Therapy Institute.

In Solidarity,

The Agape Therapy Institute Family

#blacklivesmatter #blackmentalhealthmatters #melanatedvoices #mentalhealth #mentalhealthmatters #trauma #systemicracism #antiracism #agape #nonprofit #orlando

Tags:

  • antiracism
  • black lives matter
  • blm
  • community
  • counseling
  • healing
  • racial justice
  • relationships
  • relationships
  • relationships
  • resilience
  • resilience
  • resilience
  • resilience
  • resilience
  • trauma

A Therapist's Advice for Your Break Up, Separation, or Divorce

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By:  Alexis Pardo, LCSW

Separation is a time that can feel like someone dropped us off in the middle of the ocean and said “swim to shore!” And then we think: Where the eff is the shore? How the eff did I get here? Do I get a float or even a compass? But no one is there to answer your questions. You feel so alone and scared and you have no idea how far away from land you are. 

It’s earth shattering to learn that your partner of X amount of time is not all-in anymore. Often you’ll experience absurd amounts of self-loathing, difficulty sleeping and eating, uncertainty, and  fear. You’re looking at this article because you’re scouring the internet trying to figure out what to do. How do you solve this? Well there are definitely a few tips that might save you some of your sanity in this situation. 

  1. Don’t look up relationship advice.
    Stop looking up how to fix relationships or relationship advice in general! You feel really out of control and this is normal. You did not agree to this so it’s very natural that you want to find a way to take back a little control. This is not going to help you and will only encourage you to take all the blame for the relationship falling apart. It takes two to tango and the responsibility is shared between the both of you. Yes, in general it would be great if you could XYZ in future relationships but if the other person isn’t reciprocating and saying “yes, let’s work on this” then there is no relationship advice that is going to fix this. If they eventually say they want to work on the relationship, then this would be the next step but until then drop it. 

  2. Have compassion.
    Hold your pain with compassion. No, you should not be over this yet. Your partner just left you. That hurts and acknowledging that pain is the kindest thing you can do for yourself. 

  3. Find support.
    Surround yourself with the support of your friends and family. No, you are not a burden - anytime you think you are, express gratitude instead. Everyone needs a little support sometimes. 

  4. Give yourself lots of time.
    Understand that this takes time. You are grieving not only the loss of the relationship but the loss of the future with this person. You will go through the stages of grief. Sometimes you might feel stuck in sadness/depression for a day and the next day you can experience all the stages in one hour. You might feel like you are going crazy but you’re not! Your psyche is trying to make sense of this abrupt loss.

  5. Don’t talk to the kids about it.
    If you have children, I feel for you because you have to be even stronger on days that you feel horrible. Remember to keep them out of this. It does not matter what your partner did, this is an adult matter only. If your children end up being your sounding board, they won’t learn how to process their own feelings. Whether this is their parent or not (i.e., step parent) they also need this time to adjust to these drastic changes. Don’t let them overhear you talking about your partner either. This kind of sharing is damaging and not appropriate. 

  6. Focus on what is within your control.
    Focus on the certainties in your life (work, health, friendships, family, hobbies, your strengths, etc). If things are kind of in the air, it can be scarier so recognizing what’s within your control will really help. You can write a list to keep on you so that when you go down the rabbit hole of despair you can reference this list. You won’t feel 100% better but any percentage improvement is better than the way you feel in that moment. 

  7. Therapy?
    If you need more support, seek a therapist. They can hold that space for you to experience the pain you are experiencing and support you through this. 
  8. You got this!
    Remember that you are worthy of love! This one person doesn’t determine your worth. 

It’s okay to not be okay! This is what it is and what it feels like right now but it will change. I wish you the best with whatever outcome unfolds. 


Alexis Pardo is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker at Agape Therapy Institute. To learn more about Alexis or to book an appointment with her, visit her page on our website by clicking here or call us at (407) 900-8633 to speak with a Patient Care Coordinator.


Photo Credit:  Pixabay

Tags:

  • anxiety
  • codependency
  • couples therapy
  • depression
  • healing
  • mental health
  • mindfulness
  • psychotherapy
  • relationships
  • self-care
  • stress

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